Burnout: A collective responsibility


Burnout. It happens even to the kindest, warmest hearted people. In fact they are possibly the most vulnerable to it. Those in the caring professions: nurses, doctors, teachers, social workers. Those with caring responsibilities at home. What do I mean by burnout? When your energy is sapped and stretched to the limit. When demands exceed your capacity. When you have no time for you, to replenish yourself. When you put others before yourself so often you are in danger of making yourself ill. When you feel that you have no choice but to carry on, everyone else’s needs are so important. You might not see the early warning signs. You build a hard but brittle shell around your psyche. You begin to get impatient, irritable. You begin to not care. The shell starts to crack. When you’re surprised to find you hate your job that you once put your heart…

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To those who fear labelling: on diagnosing neurodiversity


A “label” is not a diagnosis. Not having a diagnosis does not protect a child from labels. They are already labelled, “Weirdo”, “Nobody likes you”, “Cry baby”. Denial does not make a thing go away. What about later in life? Does a diagnosis hold you back? That depends on how you use it. Knowing yourself leads to better choices in life, working with your strengths and accepting your own nature. We do not have to be limited by a diagnosis, in fact it can be liberating to be acknowledged. It is a starting point for meeting your needs. The diagnosis does not have to define your entire being, it is a “label” in the sense that it is a generalisation, but in reality individuals are infinitely varied. Diagnoses are convenient umbrella terms to help us categorise and describe particular issues that people have. How it affects someone depends on…

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Awakening to the Power of Plants

See with heart cover sw

I have always been in love with green nature. As a herbalist I am in awe of the power of plants. I feel a deep connection to their energy, vitality and transformative power. Over the last few years my work has evolved towards a written expression of this, on my other blog at heartseer.wordpress.com and through my published book “See with Heart”. I want to inspire the awakening to healing and connection at this level. I have been writing poetry, which is often centred around plants and nature, and also philosophy with a focus on emotional healing. If you’d like to know more, please have a look heartseer.wordpress.com

Janey Colbourne 2016

What is neurodiversity?

I campaign for the recognition of neurodiversity precisely because it is a spectrum and I think society needs to be more accepting and accommodating of the breadth of human traits. In some ways I think it is the structure of society is pathological, not people’s brains, through being so narrow in expectations. Even dyslexia has positive attributes that have an evolutionary advantage.
The terms neurodiversity (ND) and neurotypical (NT) are popular in ASD (autism spectrum disorder) circles. Neurodiverse means not the “normal” average or typical type of brain function and perception, such as someone with ASD, ADHD, dyslexia, dyspraxia etc., in other words a neurodevelopmental disorder. Neurodiversity is a nice word for it because it is broad and doesn’t have negative connotations like the word “disorder”. Neurotypical is the majority of the population that has a “typical” brain structure. Obviously we know everyone is an individual and people can having varying degrees of NT or ND in different areas of function, which is why we talk about a spectrum. Neither term is meant to label a person in terms of value. Diagnosis depends on how much impact it makes on a person’s life.


Constipation is a common problem, frequently due simply to lifestyle factors. It may occur as a symptom of bowel disorders, such as IBS, or of more systemic problems, such as under-active thyroid. Sometimes an individual’s constitution can predispose them to a tendency for constipation, but this will still respond to suitable treatment. If there is an underlying cause then that obviously needs to be addressed, although constipation can be treated directly, and improvements are usually made whatever the cause. Some medications and prescription iron tablets can cause constipation as a side effect. Ensuring that the gut flora is healthy is an essential step to preventing and treating constipation in the long term (See How to Grow a Healthy Gut Flora). It is important to have a diet rich in fruit, vegetables and wholegrain foods and an adequate water intake. A diet high in refined foods and sugar leads to a congested and sluggish bowel, with an unhealthy balance of microbes in the gut. Fibre is important to add bulk to the stool. Soluble fibre is in fruit and vegetable skins, oats and oatbran, flax seed and psyllium husk (See How to Grow a Healthy Gut Flora). It absorbs water to become bulky and soft and also helps to carry toxins out of the body. Insoluble fibre such as wheat bran also adds bulk and can help to keep bowels moving, but it doesn’t absorb water, tends to be more harsh, and can cause griping and discomfort if taken in large amounts. Healthy oils such as coconut, flax, hemp ands fish oils can help to lubricate the bowels and keeps things moving.

How to Grow a Healthy Gut Flora

The gut flora consists of many different strains of probiotic bacteria that help us to digest our food and maintain a healthy immune system. Taking probiotic supplements can be helpful in increasing our natural population, but are there foods we can eat to encourage them and how does the effect of this compare to taking a supplement?

It is possible to encourage them naturally through diet and one of the benefits of this is that it allows a variety of strains to flourish, which is the most beneficial to health. Probiotic supplements tend to contain only a few strains, although some also contain prebiotics such as inulin or FOS (fructooligosaccharides), types of plant fibre that probiotics like to feed on, which supports other strains as well as the ones contained in the supplement. Consuming prebiotics in the diet helps to grow a healthy gut flora.

According to Dr Gary Huffnagle, prebiotics are naturally present as soluble fibres in legumes, unpeeled fruits and vegetables and in wholegrains such as oats and barley. Inulin and FOS are types of soluble fibre. Inulin is present in chicory, wheat and onions. Soluble fibre absorbs liquid so it’s important to drink plenty of water for the greatest benefit from the fibre and to keep your digestion comfortable. If you’re not used to fibre in your diet you may experience some temporary discomfort and wind, but this should settle down soon and can be minimised by starting with a low amount of fibre and gradually increasing it.

Fermented foods and drinks are a natural source of probiotic bacteria. A well known source is live yogurt and probiotic yogurt drinks. These can contain high levels of probiotics. Soya yogurts are available for those who cannot have milk. Other fermented foods include: some aged cheeses and cottage cheese, that have been produced by fermentation, rather than with enzymes; kefir, a fermented milk drink; sauerkraut, which is fermented cabbage; miso made from soya, grains and salt; and naturally fermented pickles. Huffnagle points out that many pickles sold nowadays are not true pickles, which should be fermented in salt water, but are soaked and preserved in vinegar, which does not give the same results.

A probiotics friendly diet can be combined with probiotic supplementation if necessary. Some IBS sufferers require very high doses of probiotics to relieve symptoms. There are probiotic products available for specific needs, but for everyday health a diet high in probiotics and prebiotics should maintain a healthy digestion, which is fundamental to other aspects of health.

Reference: Huffnagle, G. with Wernick S. (2007) The Probiotics Revolution Vermilion, London

Probiotics and the Immune System- What’s the Link?

It is fairly well known that probiotics are the beneficial bacteria that live in our gut and are essential to help us digest food. However their benefits are much greater than that. There has been much interest lately in the connection between the health of our gut flora and immunity. How is it that probiotics affect our immune system, supporting our immunity, fighting off infections and reducing autoimmune reactions?

Probiotic bacteria in the lining of the small and large intestine compete with harmful bacteria for space and access to the cells lining the gut and to the bloodstream. In addition to this, probiotics can support the immune cells in the gut wall. According to Optibac, a leading manufacturer of probiotics, their strain of L. acidophilus supports immune cells and also creates lactic acid, which inhibits harmful bacteria such as Listeria. Some strains of Bifidobacteria, which live in the colon, specifically B. longum, B. breve and B. infantis encourage the body’s production of antibodies, as well as competing with harmful bacteria for space.

In a randomized controlled trial over the winter of 2006-2007, Optibac’s powdered probiotic supplement “for your child’s health” was found to reduce incidence of common childhood infections by 25% in 135 school age children. Dr Gary Huffnagle, a researcher at the University of Michigan, says that, “Some bacteria produce their own antibiotics. These chemicals don’t affect us, but they inhibit the growth of other bacteria. Also as microbes digest food, their metabolic by-products may have adverse effects on their competitors.”

Disturbance in gut flora balance has been linked to autoimmune problems, as an inadequate population of probiotics can lead to a “leaky gut”, in which poorly digested food proteins can pass across the gut lining into the bloodstream, where they trigger an immune reaction, leading to symptoms such as inflammation. Foreign proteins of this size are not normally present in the blood, so the immune system tags them as potentially harmful invaders.

Dr Huffnagle explains the immune link between the gut and the respiratory system as “everything we inhale, we also swallow”. As we inhale pollen, it gets trapped in mucus, and much of it is swallowed. So a “leaky gut” may cause an autoimmune response to pollen particles. A healthy gut flora may help to prevent this. Probiotic levels may be highly significant in allergy development. Also the gut flora support the production of regulatory immune cells, that wind down immune reactions after infection, and prevent excessive inflammation.

Healthy gut bacteria can be encouraged through a diet high in soluble fibre, also known as “prebiotics’, as well as through consuming yogurt and taking probiotics. Prebiotics, present also in some probiotic supplements, feed the growth of our own natural, varied gut flora.